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Mystery Petalodont tooth


Archie

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I had a hunt for some shark teeth the other day in the Lower Carboniferous/Mississippian of Scotland and found an interesting Petalodont I havent been able to identify, its very similar in shape to Petalodus acuminatus but has no imbricated basal ridge between the crown and the base and the ornamentation on the crown is also very different from P. acuminatus. Any thoughts on what it could be would be greatly appreciated!

 

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Very nice tooth, and definitely petalodus. Wish I could help with further ID. I see what you're saying about the lack of imbrication and the striations on crown surface. Hope someone here can help. Good luck!

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Cant help with ID, Sam, but that tooth is fantastic!

 

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This is a stunning specimen. Even the matrix is attractive! :wub:

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A beauty, Sam (and I can't help with the ID, I usually ask you about Carb teeth. :) )

Tarquin      image.png.b7b2dcb2ffdfe5c07423473150a7ac94.png  image.png.4828a96949a85749ee3c434f73975378.png  image.png.6354171cc9e762c1cfd2bf647445c36f.png  image.png.06d7471ec1c14daf7e161f6f50d5d717.png

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The ornamentation you see on the crown is actually the result of erosion of the outside layer of enamel. In life, it would have been smooth. I see two possibilities here, either it is Petalodus acuminatus that has been weathered, or it is Petalodus linguifer. The geological survey of Illinois presents a P. linguifer tooth and it looks identical to yours.

 

Unfortunately P. linguifer has not been updated since the mid-19th century.

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Here is another Petalodont from Scotland. The info which came with the tooth was as follows:

Lower Carbonlferous

Upper Visean

Brigantian Stage

Trearne Quarry

Beith, Strathcyde

Scotland

 

the tooth was not identified to species. That's all I know about the tooth which is presented here for comparison purposes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_1560.thumb.JPG.ca6215f1e1eb8bd06de5999076a5f875.JPG

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  • 5 months later...
On 5/13/2018 at 4:36 PM, TNCollector said:

The ornamentation you see on the crown is actually the result of erosion of the outside layer of enamel. In life, it would have been smooth. I see two possibilities here, either it is Petalodus acuminatus that has been weathered, or it is Petalodus linguifer. The geological survey of Illinois presents a P. linguifer tooth and it looks identical to yours.

 

Unfortunately P. linguifer has not been updated since the mid-19th century.

Thanks Jim! Sorry I only just noticed your post, I'll have a look at P. linguifer! I dont think its an eroded P. acuminatus just because Ive found them without the enamel on the crown before and they looked very different to this, I also split it out and there is nothing left in the negative. Although it could have been eroded pre-fossilization it seems unlikely as the edges of the root are paper thin.

 

On 5/13/2018 at 5:16 PM, fossilselachian said:

Here is another Petalodont from Scotland. The info which came with the tooth was as follows:

Lower Carbonlferous

Upper Visean

Brigantian Stage

Trearne Quarry

Beith, Strathcyde

Scotland

 

the tooth was not identified to species. That's all I know about the tooth which is presented here for comparison purposes.

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_1560.thumb.JPG.ca6215f1e1eb8bd06de5999076a5f875.JPG

That's a really beautiful example of a Petalodus acuminatus anterior tooth! Trearne is one of my fave sites :D 

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@Archie  I have a lower Permian petalodont tooth similar to yours, though in chert. Would you like to see? 

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"Journey through a universe ablaze with changes" Phil Ochs

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That's exceedingly beautiful! :wub: Thanks for showing! Your tooth appears to be showing the lingual side and my tooth is labial side up but they do look similar and some petalodonts do only have the imbrications on the lingual side. I'm meeting some staff members at the National Museum of Scotland soon to have a look through the collection so I'll see f there are any others like it!

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I would have thought mine was labial side. :shrug:

It is slightly convex towards observer.

"Journey through a universe ablaze with changes" Phil Ochs

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@Innocentx @Carl

Your tags will not work if You do not select the user name from the drop down menu when using the @(member) tag.

You will know it worked when the @(user name) is highlighted.

 

Regards,

Tony

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2 hours ago, Innocentx said:

I would have thought mine was labial side. :shrug:

It is slightly convex towards observer.

I thought it was the lingual side as basal ridge is much wider than it would normally be on the labial side, is your tooth still all there or is it an impression with the original tooth dissolved away? If it was that would explain why it is convex rather than concave.

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22 minutes ago, ynot said:

@Innocentx @Carl

Your tags will not work if You do not select the user name from the drop down menu when using the @(member) tag.

You will know it worked when the @(user name) is highlighted.

 

Regards,

Tony

Thanks Tony!

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47 minutes ago, Archie said:

is your tooth still all there or is it an impression with the original tooth dissolved away

It's hard to tell with this tooth in chert but I think it's all there.

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"Journey through a universe ablaze with changes" Phil Ochs

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