paleozoicfish

Favorite Trilobites In Your Collection!

722 posts in this topic

Hello some serious bugs on here. This is one of my favorites! I found it a few years ago. Novakella. Ordovician Llanvirn Series. Shropshire. UK. Trilobite measures 122mm or 4.3/4 inches. This is the largest example of the genus found in Britian.

post-5837-0-69674500-1306439586_thumb.jpg

Edited by Olenus

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Olenus , very big and nice trilobite ..... more ;)

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Hello some serious bugs on here. This is one of my favorites! I found it a few years ago. Novakella. Ordovician Llanvirn Series. Shropshire. UK. Trilobite measures 122mm or 4.3/4 inches. This is the largest example of the genus found in Britian.

post-5837-0-69674500-1306439586_thumb.jpg

Very nice!

-PzF

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How could anybody get tired of soft-bodied trilos, PzF?? That is a beaut'.

If only I had something comparable to all of you guys' specimens to contribute.

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Hello some serious bugs on here. This is one of my favorites! I found it a few years ago. Novakella. Ordovician Llanvirn Series. Shropshire. UK. Trilobite measures 122mm or 4.3/4 inches. This is the largest example of the genus found in Britian.

post-5837-0-69674500-1306439586_thumb.jpg

Great to have you on board here Olenus. I have admired this fine cyclopygid from the UK Fossil Network. It has been a while since I have visited that fine site for a wonderful dose of British bugs. It will be a real treat to see the fabulous trilobites from across the pond here at TFF.

Thanks again for posting! :D

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Now to the other end of the scale. A super rare Cyclopgyid trilobite Ellipsotaphrus monophthalmus. Ordovician. Shropshire, UK. Its only known in the literature from Shropshire from a few partial specimens.

Trilobite measures 9mm.

post-5837-0-81409600-1306525825_thumb.jpg

post-5837-0-12942300-1306525841_thumb.jpg

Edited by Olenus

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Now to the other end of the scale. A super rare Cyclopgyid trilobite Ellipsotaphrus monophthalmus. Ordovician. Shropshire, UK. Its only known in the literature from Shropshire from a few partial specimens.

Trilobite measures 9mm.

Very nice, Lee, so the previous as this rare trilo :wub:

Thanks for sharing ;)

The word ''monophthalmus'' means in greek ''having one eye''. Is that real?

Edited by astron

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Yes, astron, this is an amazing trilobite, and its species name does indeed stand for that.

This trilobite has a huge single eye running all along the front and sides of its head.

This single eye alone is supposed to have contained some 2,000 unique lenses!!

Lovely trilobite, Lee!

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Now to the other end of the scale. A super rare Cyclopgyid trilobite Ellipsotaphrus monophthalmus. Ordovician. Shropshire, UK. Its only known in the literature from Shropshire from a few partial specimens.

Trilobite measures 9mm.

Quite spectacular to see this magnificent monocular trilobite (literally). :blink:

Attached is a free pdf with incredible images of another one-eyed cyclopygid from your neck of the woods. Microparia lusca is described: "with eyes united anteriorly to form a single visual surface" (Plate 2, figures 1-5). Joe Botting from the UK has a line drawing and thread about M.lusca that can be google searched as well.

Thanks Lee for posting another superb trilobite and topic of discussion! :D

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Yes, astron, this is an amazing trilobite, and its species name does indeed stand for that.

This trilobite has a huge single eye running all along the front and sides of its head.

This single eye alone is supposed to have contained some 2,000 unique lenses!!

Lovely trilobite, Lee!

Hello Astron,as FrozenInTime says it has a massive compound eye that covers the entire front and sides of the head.

Hello Piranha, thanks for the link.

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Hello Astron,as FrozenInTime says it has a massive compound eye that covers the entire front and sides of the head.

Hello Piranha, thanks for the link.

Thank you both, Lee and FrozeninTime, for the amazing explanation :o

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Quite spectacular to see this magnificent monocular trilobite (literally). :blink:

Attached is a free pdf with incredible images of another one-eyed cyclopygid from your neck of the woods. Microparia lusca is described: "with eyes united anteriorly to form a single visual surface" (Plate 2, figures 1-5). Joe Botting from the UK has a line drawing and thread about M.lusca that can be google searched as well.

Thanks Lee for posting another superb trilobite and topic of discussion! :D

Very impressive pdf, Scott.:wub: Thanks for posting ;)

This magnificent tiny eye seems to be of a scientific imagination movie :o

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For you serious bug worshippers...I got an update link from Fossils Direct and they have recently loaded up what I imagine are pretty special UK specimens judging by the price's :) ... Take a look incase you hadnt noticed them...Click the recent additions page...

http://fossilsdirect.co.uk/

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For you serious bug worshippers...

Haha..... just who are you referring to sir? Thanks for the link Steve as it has been many months since I have visited that great website. That is a wonderful bunch of UK trilobites. My two favorite bugs are the Cybeloides from Scotland and the Stygina from North Wales. The bank account would certainly be Sty-inging after that acquisition! :o:P

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''Haha..... just who are you referring to sir?''

Scott... If the cap fits, wear it :P... Good choices... The finest ever found isnt a bad benchmark for your bug collection... :)

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Here is a truly incredible example of trilobite morphology. Before it was formally described by Morzadec, 2001 it was simply referred to as the "Trident Trilobite". Little imagination is needed to understand the species name assigned to this alien bug as a three-forked trifurcatus. This bizarre bug is easily one of my all-time favorites and required nerves of steel to remove from its protective enclosure and photograph to present here in this great thread of trilobites.

Happily worth the effort though.... enjoy everyone! :D

Walliserops trifurcatus

Middle Devonian - Upper Emsian

Foum Zguid Fm - Dra Valley, Morocco

post-4301-0-17490800-1307815961_thumb.jpg

post-4301-0-92326900-1307815966_thumb.jpg

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Here is a truly incredible example of trilobite morphology. Before it was formally described by Morzadec, 2001 it was simply referred to as the "Trident Trilobite". Little imagination is needed to understand the species name assigned to this alien bug as a three-forked trifurcatus. This bizarre bug is easily one of my all-time favorites and required nerves of steel to remove from its protective enclosure and photograph to present here in this great thread of trilobites.

Happily worth the effort though.... enjoy everyone! :D

Walliserops trifurcatus

Middle Devonian - Upper Emsian

Foum Zguid Fm - Dra Valley, Morocco

post-4301-0-17490800-1307815961_thumb.jpg

post-4301-0-92326900-1307815966_thumb.jpg

Awe,

now see I knew you were holding out on us Scott!!!!!

That is an incredible specimen of Walliseops trifurcatus!:wub:

What other gems have you got hidden away?

Dan

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Here is a truly incredible example of trilobite morphology. Before it was formally described by Morzadec, 2001 it was simply referred to as the "Trident Trilobite". Little imagination is needed to understand the species name assigned to this alien bug as a three-forked trifurcatus. This bizarre bug is easily one of my all-time favorites and required nerves of steel to remove from its protective enclosure and photograph to present here in this great thread of trilobites.

Happily worth the effort though.... enjoy everyone! :D

Walliserops trifurcatus

Middle Devonian - Upper Emsian

Foum Zguid Fm - Dra Valley, Morocco

post-4301-0-17490800-1307815961_thumb.jpg

post-4301-0-92326900-1307815966_thumb.jpg

There is no combination of emoticons, drool factors, or words in the English language, and all other languages for that matter, that can put together even the most minor compliment for that trilobite. Oh. My. God.

What can I say?

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I wanted to refrain from commenting any further in this thread unless I had something to contribute, but just have to say "Wow" and "Bizarre!" What possible purpose could that 'trident' have served? Seems like it would have been a little unwieldy to use for catching prey or protecting itself when the others could do fine without.

I like the spines on top of the eyes too.. nice touch. ;)

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I...What possible purpose could that 'trident' have served? Seems like it would have been a little unwieldy to use for catching prey or protecting itself when the others could do fine without...

Sensory organ? Chemical/taste, electrical...?

Scott, this one looks perfect! :wub:

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i'd like to see ur asaphus scott! B) its stunning too!!

thats a great poseidon trilobite! :D

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Awe,

now see I knew you were holding out on us Scott!!!!!

That is an incredible specimen of Walliseops trifurcatus!:wub:

What other gems have you got hidden away?

Dan

Thanks everyone! :):)

Dan: I am certainly not holding out.... nothing is hidden away. If you check my thread in the member collections forum you will find all of the bugs posted over the first few pages. The only new elements here are updated photos just for PzF's spectacular showcase of trilobites.

For anyone interested follow the attached link:

LINK

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Thanks everyone! :):)

Dan: I am certainly not holding out.... nothing is hidden away. If you check my thread in the member collections forum you will find all of the bugs posted over the first few pages. The only new elements here are updated photos just for PzF's spectacular showcase of trilobites.

For anyone interested follow the attached link:

LINK

Yeah now I'm seeing that Walliserops in post 19 hidden in the shadows!!!!!:blush:

I assume it's posted elsewhere in that thread too!

At any rate you've got some amazing specimens Scott!

Absolutely spectacular photos of an outstanding bug!!!!!:wub: :wub: :wub: :wub: :wub:

I'm going to have to go back through that thread and this one to refresh my memory!eat%20popcorn.gif

Thanks for sharing your awesome collection with us!:bow:

Dan :)

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it is one of my favorite trilobite :wub:

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Recently I received some new trilobites through a trade with a fellow member (Shamalama) here on the Fossil Forum. The bugs are not as spectacular as some of the previous examples shown off throughout this great thread, but all are new specimens that I previously didn't have in my collection! That said I'm really excited as I now have six new species in my slowly growing trilobite collection!!!!!

The first specimen is from the Devonian Mahantango Formation and was collected near Mausdale, Pennsylvania.

post-2629-0-97181200-1307905940_thumb.jpg Dipleura sp. This is a very cool enrolled example and an awesome addition to my collection.

Next is a really cool double plate with two Cedaria minor on it. The specimen is from the Middle Cambrian Weeks Formation of Miilard Co. Utah.

post-2629-0-35824500-1307906120_thumb.jpg Although very small these have been on my want list for some time and I could not have received a better specimen(s).

Next is a very nice part and counterpart of Piochaspis sellata from the Middle Cambrian Chisholm Shale at Half Moon Mine, Nevada.

post-2629-0-90130800-1307906404_thumb.jpg

And this is something I've always wanted for my collection! It also comes from the Middle Cambrian Chisholm Shale at Half Moon Mine, Nevada. It is a fairly complete example of Zacanthoides typicallis! Zacanthoides is one of my favorite trilobites and was my avatar until recently!

post-2629-0-94432300-1307906625_thumb.jpgpost-2629-0-73274200-1307907477_thumb.jpg

The other two specimens I received are a very small example of Brachyaspidion microps from the Middle Cambrian Wheeler Formation of Utah and an enrolled specimen of the Ordovician bug Ptyocephalus yersini from the Filmore Formation, Millard Co., Utah. Unfortunately, I was unable to get satisfactory photos of either specimen so I can't show either one at this moment.

So all in all I had a stellar trade and received many new specimens not previously held in my collection. I'd like to thank Dave for his generosity and hope I can match it with the material I'm sending him!

Dan

Edited by palaeopix

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