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ridgerd22511

Dinosaur Fossil Find

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Ludwigia

Can you please explain in detail how you clean your finds.

Edited by Ludwigia

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Stocksdale

This is a marine bivalve shell, a scallop (probably Chesapecten sp.) >LINK<

~.JPG

Cool. You've got a definite FOSSIL ! :) And probably a few more in your pile.

Edited by Stocksdale

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Stocksdale

It is just one piece. The grey side is clean. The other side still has the iron ore that incased the entire item

This sounds like the outside of the rock is the brown color and the inside is gray. Maybe some sort of iron concretion?

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tmaier

Notice directly below the pecten there seems to be a fern fossil. And touching the pecten to the lower left is what seems to be a long bone, cracked.

These items seem very diverse. It looks like they were gathered from many different locations.

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Troodon

Notice directly below the pecten there seems to be a fern fossil. And touching the pecten to the lower left is what seems to be a long bone, cracked.

These items seem very diverse. It looks like they were gathered from many different locations.

I do not believe that item is a fern but possibly a broken pecten. The other items you mention appear to be bone but its not uncommon to find whale and porpoise material in that locality.

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tmaier

On second look, you might be right that the "fern" is really an mold made by a pecten.

One thing I mean by the diversity is that I see the purest of white limestone and pieces that are heavily saturated with iron. This doesn't look like it all came from the same place.

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Auspex

On second look, you might be right that the "fern" is really an mold made by a pecten.

One thing I mean by the diversity is that I see the purest of white limestone and pieces that are heavily saturated with iron. This doesn't look like it all came from the same place.

This is a typical mix of what one would find in a stream bed in that area. :)

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Herb

a very odd non-fossiliferous object.

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Ramo

I think I have solved this puzzle!

I think that these things are some kind of left over metallic items from a possible foundry or something like that. I think they are encrusted with some type of rust/mineral from the water. This summer we found many weird objects like that in our local lake. The lake is slightly salty, and the "Crust was over a 1/4 inch thick. If we threw them hard against some rocks, the crust fell off leaving the metal center that was the same kind of shiny gray color as what is being shown here. We found a knife, a spear (gig) head, and other assorted metal objects that had spent a long time in the water. Some were hard to identify. I don't think these are carved. I think these were found just like he is saying, and he is "cleaning" the coating off. That would also explain the magnetic property. Now what they were before became encrusted is the next question.

Ramo

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tmaier

What you are describing is called slag. I come from slag country (Wisconsin and Michigan).

http://www.google.com/images?hl=en&q=slag&gbv=1&sa=X&oi=image_result_group&ei=LJsHVLf4O9KTgwS2vICYDA&ved=0CCgQsAQ

I have never seen any slag that would look like these objects.

Edited by tmaier

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JohnJ

I think I have solved this puzzle!

I think that these things are some kind of left over metallic items from a possible foundry or something like that. I think they are encrusted with some type of rust/mineral from the water. This summer we found many weird objects like that in our local lake. The lake is slightly salty, and the "Crust was over a 1/4 inch thick. If we threw them hard against some rocks, the crust fell off leaving the metal center that was the same kind of shiny gray color as what is being shown here. We found a knife, a spear (gig) head, and other assorted metal objects that had spent a long time in the water. Some were hard to identify. I don't think these are carved. I think these were found just like he is saying, and he is "cleaning" the coating off. That would also explain the magnetic property. Now what they were before became encrusted is the next question.

Ramo

You might be on to something, Ramo. I've found similar encrusted items where the sand and other debris is solidified to the exterior of the iron object. For instance, a ball of old wire might consolidate in a similar fashion. I've found things like that which were 'so far gone' that you couldn't identify it beyond something with a high iron content. It also explains the gray and rust colors which were typical of finds I've seen. Good observation, Ramo.

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Ramo

It may not be slag, but I believe it is some form of metal that has undergone extreme chemical weathering. Here is a piece of chain that we found this summer. It didn't have near the "crust" of the other items we found, but notice where I knocked it off the same metallic gray color as the items in question. I no longer think this person is trying to pull one over on us. I think he has found some weird metal objects with a bunch of crusty-rust on them.

Ramo

(If I am correct I will scientifically name them Crusty rustys)

Now I'm starting to stutter. John, feel free to delete my stutters)

post-40-0-06169400-1409785220_thumb.jpg

post-40-0-80362100-1409785236_thumb.jpg

Edited by Ramo

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tmaier

You're right that the iron core of that chain has created an encrustation that seems to match what is encrusting the mystery object. I think you are right that the mystery object is iron of some type.

I've played with so much slag as a kid, though, that I can't see it as normal slag. We had so much of it from all the smelting that it was used to make concrete block (which we called "cinder block"), and to build road beds and railroad beds and anything else people could think of.

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JohnJ
....

Now I'm starting to stutter. John, feel free to delete my stutters)

Done.

Who cares about multiple posts... :D I think you have put this topic on course to a solution.

You have me remembering all the hundreds of crusty rusty blobs I've seen along creeks, rivers, and the coast. :)

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RyanNREMTP

I hope everyone's tetanus shot is up to date.

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ridgerd22511

May I post one more image?

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Troodon

If it helps this process of course.

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JohnJ

May I post one more image?

Of course.

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darrow

I think I have solved this puzzle!

I think that these things are some kind of left over metallic items from a possible foundry or something like that. I think they are encrusted with some type of rust/mineral from the water. This summer we found many weird objects like that in our local lake. The lake is slightly salty, and the "Crust was over a 1/4 inch thick. If we threw them hard against some rocks, the crust fell off leaving the metal center that was the same kind of shiny gray color as what is being shown here. We found a knife, a spear (gig) head, and other assorted metal objects that had spent a long time in the water. Some were hard to identify. I don't think these are carved. I think these were found just like he is saying, and he is "cleaning" the coating off. That would also explain the magnetic property. Now what they were before became encrusted is the next question.

Ramo

I tend to agree... I've "cleaned" up a few pieces of metal I've picked up from salt water environments and after removing the encrusted rust/mineral layers, the surface of the remaining metal often looks similar to the object of this puzzle.

Darrow

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jpc

I have just caught all this discussion. I hate to say it, ridger, but your xrays do not look like bone xrays. I have xrayed a loy of fossils, so trust me on this one.

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PFOOLEY

This is man made...not a fossil.

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Ludwigia

May I post one more image?

Of course. Why suddenly ask extra? We are however still awaiting your responses to our many requests (see above). It would increase your credibility here to get some answers to our as yet unanswered questions.

Edited by Ludwigia

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uncoat

Alright i will throw my hat in this already confusing ring.. I think post #62 is the key. As fossilised6s pointed out, it looks like the photo to the right in post #62 is how a similar "fossil" looked before "prep" and the photo on the left of post #62 is how it looked after "prep". Im not sure how one would determine when to stop "prep" going about it in this fashion but this might be why the "fossil" looks carved. Because this is how it was "prepped". If it was prepped with the idea of a dino skull in mind, then that may be why it bears a very slight resemblance to one.

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painshill

Alright i will throw my hat in this already confusing ring.. I think post #62 is the key. As fossilised6s pointed out, it looks like the photo to the right in post #62 is how a similar "fossil" looked before "prep" and the photo on the left of post #62 is how it looked after "prep". Im not sure how one would determine when to stop "prep" going about it in this fashion but this might be why the "fossil" looks carved. Because this is how it was "prepped". If it was prepped with the idea of a dino skull in mind, then that may be why it bears a very slight resemblance to one.

Yes, that's my take too.

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mammothhunter

As a carver (Of mammoth ivory generally and gemstones), I must say that these are not 'cleaned', they are carved.

I know everyone wants to give the benefit of the doubt, but after looking through ALL of his photos, I see no evidence of what could be considered weathering on the 'cleaned' specimens.

What i see are clumsily carved rocks. In his 'T-rex' labeled piece, you can see in the lines of the item, there are very clean marks, that suddenly (In his later 'cleaned' photos) turn rougher. And not to mention the reddish 'glue' or whatnot near the 'eyes', which have no purpose (They are assuredly NOT natural, the reddish areas) other than to suggest eyes, as are the 'teeth' and 'nostril' area.

They are all features (Including on the flatter 'specimen') to suggest some kind of feature that the person obviously lacks the ability to carve realistically.

My background is primarily in Geology / Mineralogy and I've also been a carver for a number of years so I know what the marks of carving tools look like and what natural weathering look like.

People here are too polite to say it (I agree that politeness has a place 99% of the time) but I will go ahead and say it : Stop wasting people's time with your clumsy creations and show the actual fossils you showed in the photos with the boxes of materials.

I've seen any number of concretitions, minerals and the like to know what odd objects look like and I can say that his 'skull' is ridiculous.

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