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Rocky Stoner

Coral ? which is which ?

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Rocky Stoner

Hi again friends,

  I recently broke up some larger chunks of shale that were full of some of the nicest examples of coral that I've seen here. Sort of a shame as I was looking for trilobites, but I saved these pieces. I'm wondering if the 3 samples are of the same coral ? or are they different ?

Thanks again,

kind regards.

:) 

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ynot

I will leave the id to others.

Just wanted to say that You found some nice looking pieces.

 

I do see 3+ types of coral.

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Rocky Stoner
3 minutes ago, ynot said:

I will leave the id to others.

Just wanted to say that You found some nice looking pieces.

 

I do see 3+ types of coral.

There was a LOT of this in those last chunks. I hesitated before busting them up .... all to not find what I was looking for.:trilo::angry:

If I find more like this, I think I'll keep more of it.

Thanks ynot.

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Virgilian

Also known as solitary rugose horn corals, which went belly-up--extinct--at the close of the Permian Period of the Paleozoic Era. Looks like lattice-type bryozoan colonies at upper right and lower right in first photograph.

 

 

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Rockwood

I'm pretty sure something was living in or on that horn.

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Arizona Chris

The alignment and structure suggest the top corals are all one, with the epitheca missing in the middle.  Are those Devonian?

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Rockwood
23 minutes ago, Arizona Chris said:

The alignment and structure suggest the top corals are all one, with the epitheca missing in the middle.  Are those Devonian?

Agreed, but doesn't that look like the mold of something intruding where the epitheca is missing ?

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RJB

I dont know much about that older stuff, but you sure do find lots of stuff!

 

RB

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Rocky Stoner
1 hour ago, Arizona Chris said:

The alignment and structure suggest the top corals are all one, with the epitheca missing in the middle.  Are those Devonian?

Yes, Devonian, Mahantango fm,( in the tag line)

1 hour ago, RJB said:

I dont know much about that older stuff, but you sure do find lots of stuff!

 

RB

Its all right on top of the ground, just peel back the sod, rinse em' off and crack em' open.

Will do some more looking tomorrow, working on home chores for now.

Kind regards.

:)

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fifbrindacier

Nice corals ! :envy:

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DPS Ammonite

The two corals in the third photo are exterior molds of the calice or cup of a horn coral. Similiar molds exist in the Mississipian Redwall Limestone in Arizona. Material that filled the calices hardened while the original calcium carbonate coral dissolved away. The circled concave areas in deep shadow are where the original coral dissolved away. 

 

The two coral fossils are most likely two individuals because:

1)   The impressions of septa are different. The right one has flat areas between the septa the ones on the left don't.

2)   The septa curve concave up in the right one and concave down in the left one. (see red lines.)

3)   The axis of the corals point different directions.

4)   The combined depth of the calice would be too deep for a coral of that diameter if both pieces were one individual.

 

See diagrams of horn corals from: http://www.geo.arizona.edu/geo3xx/geo308/FoldersOnServer/2003/10Reefs&corals.htm

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