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ynot

Pinniped metatarsal?

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ynot

Hey Y'all,

I was cleaning some matrix pieces and this was exposed.

I think it is an Allodesmus metatarsal but would like other (more informed) opinions on it.

DSCF5262.thumb.JPG.65aecfede2aa7b1b64cda721c8627fc1.JPGDSCF5263.thumb.JPG.f81b24337fd430b760893caa6df5e8de.JPGDSCF5264.thumb.JPG.c5b0d97868c1f2f6617d36a7760aa2c5.JPGDSCF5265.thumb.JPG.51474a6ccb1eaba127218a916ddb1203.JPGDSCF5266.thumb.JPG.8e9c269cadb34ff458fb24c648885aec.JPGDSCF5267.JPG.4dcdcf93de34330aa21bfd454778aa0b.JPG

 

 

Thanks Everyone.

 

Ynot

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doushantuo

 

jevis.jpg

Somewhere down the line,Boesse will voice an opinion on these bones,presumably

Or HarryPristis

 

 

 

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ynot

@Boesse, @Harry Pristis

Any input on this piece?

Thanks.

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PaleoRon

It looks a lot like the seal material that I have found in North Carolina.

 

 

Miocene Seal.JPG

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Harry Pristis
7 hours ago, ynot said:

@Boesse, @Harry Pristis

Any input on this piece?

Thanks.

 

If pressed, I would guess sea turtle phalanx.

 

 

turtle_sea_phalangesB.JPG

turtle_sea_phalanx.JPG

turtle_sea_phalanxC.JPG

 

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ynot

That looks like it is a good fit!

Thanks @Harry Pristis

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Boesse

This is a proximal manual phalanx of Allodesmus kernensis from digit 1 (thumb). Here's an image from the photographic plates published by Ed Mitchell (1966) of Allodesmus "kelloggi" (=kernensis)

 

image.png.5e6ff641147e2444b4bf5085c9dd871a.png

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ynot
18 minutes ago, Boesse said:

This is a proximal manual phalanx of Allodesmus kernensis from digit 1 (thumb).

Thanks Bobby.

That is an exact match for My piece.:yay-smiley-1:

I am happy that I was close to being correct on this one.:megdance:

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siteseer
22 hours ago, ynot said:

Thanks Bobby.

That is an exact match for My piece.:yay-smiley-1:

I am happy that I was close to being correct on this one.:megdance:

 

 

Hi Tony,

 

You should get yourself a copy of Mitchell (1966).  I happened to find a cheap copy very early in my collecting and it has helped a lot in seeing the difference between whale and pinniped bones in the STH bonebed.  Sea tuttle phalanges do not tend to have as well formed bone ends as mammal bones, looking more pitted as in Harry's last example.

 

Jess

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ynot
40 minutes ago, siteseer said:

 

 

Hi Tony,

 

You should get yourself a copy of Mitchell (1966).  I happened to find a cheap copy very early in my collecting and it has helped a lot in seeing the difference between whale and pinniped bones in the STH bonebed.  Sea tuttle phalanges do not tend to have as well formed bone ends as mammal bones, looking more pitted as in Harry's last example.

 

Jess

Thanks Jess.

I will look into it.

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