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BobWill

Pennsylvanian micro-fossil from Texas

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BobWill

I had a new look at an old hash plate from the Finis Shale member of the Graham Formation in jack County Texas. It's full of all the Pennsylvanian Sub-period fossils I expected, even a couple of broken trilobite pieces, but this spiral shape caught my eye as I was passing it under a microscope. That's a mm scale in one picture and a human hair in the other. I don't know my micro fossils but I'm guessing it's some kind of foram. Any help with a name?WIN_20180318_23_34_05_Pro.jpg.1dbf6a8575ccbd15e24c6024a0b61831.jpgWIN_20180318_23_36_18_Pro.jpg.578c48f8efb83eb71cd16a6cc1a5f281.jpgWIN_20180324_23_49_21_Pro.jpg.21bd5c341ff1b1df28e8f9adc489ac7d.jpg

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BobWill
34 minutes ago, DPS Ammonite said:

Could it be a spirorbis type worm tube? http://www.lakeneosho.org/Russia/Page78.html

 

 

Okay, as long as they can be in the range of around 100 microns.

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DPS Ammonite

Can you see any rice-grain shaped fusilinids in the rock? Maybe it is a cross section of one of a small/ baby one. I recall that Pennsylvanian fusilinids are common in similar aged rocks in Central Texas near Lake Brownwood. 

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Missourian

It could be a smaller foram like Ammodiscus.

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doushantuo

Might be Pseudoammodiscus priscus.

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WhodamanHD

I’d sat definitely a foram. 

4 hours ago, DPS Ammonite said:

Could it be an exterior mold of a spirorbis type worm tube? http://www.lakeneosho.org/Russia/Page78.html

 

 

No, they had yet to evolve. They evolved in the miocene, microconchs were thought to be Spirorbis until recently.

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BobWill
10 hours ago, DPS Ammonite said:

Can you see any rice-grain shaped fusilinids in the rock? Maybe it is a cross section of one of a small/ baby one. I recall that Pennsylvanian fusilinids are common in similar aged rocks in Central Texas near Lake Brownwood. 

I can't find any in this plate but they are common at the site.

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BobWill

Dr. Ben Neuman from A&M Texarkana sent this image but I don't know the size.

fusilina.jpg.5375d5fe53b35dd03e462dbcfa69ed5c.jpg

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abyssunder

Fusulinids are larger.

 

2006-02-04-112-800.jpg.7bc3fcde71e48fd76f8927164af5fb2d.jpg2014-07-18-027-1000.jpg.1114eb03bb3d5011dd3f14d06d072bd5.jpg

pictures from here

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doushantuo

Most axial sections of fusulinids look like fig.4 and 7.The morphology of a fusulinid generally is not shown in oblique view,so I've included an example of that perspective

in this figure, (uncoiling in later stages,btw).I hope this stereometrical view is helpfulgm353largeplwillist.jpg

 

Your specimen seems to be without septa,and it doesn't look moravaminnid,parathuramminoid,or earlandoid.

Personally I think Missourian is on the right track

For whatever that's worth

 

 

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abyssunder
11 hours ago, BobWill said:

Dr. Ben Neuman from A&M Texarkana sent this image but I don't know the size.

fusilina.jpg.5375d5fe53b35dd03e462dbcfa69ed5c.jpg

Fusilina cylindrica or Fusulina cylindrica ?

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