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Malcolmt

That is amazing......... perseverancee pays off..  

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Kane

Thanks, Malcolm. :) And this was just a one hour prospect / recon. 

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LiamL

Great find! I bet you're thrilled with it.

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facehugger

So awesome that you would find a trilobite so close to home...a little jealous, especially since I haven't actually found one yet!!! Great stuff...

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Al Tahan

Amazing Kane :yay-smiley-1: what a lucky find 

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FossilDAWG

That is a fantastic find!!  The lithology and fauna makes me confident that the sandier brown facies is the Anderdon (if I recall the name correctly).  At Ingersoll this facies overlies the Lucas.  It can"t be used for cement so it used to be stripped and discarded.  It isn"t surprising that it would be used for fill.

 

Don

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digit

It pays to check into old potential sites which (it seems) can offer new surprises. How nice to have someplace new to explore within walking distance. :fistbump:

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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Kane

Thanks, everyone... I'm quite excited about the prospects once I get to spend more time there. :hammer01:

 

@FossilDAWG -- Thanks, Don! I had a suspicion this material was Anderdon Mbr. I was reading a thesis a few months back where Stumm had incorrectly equated it to a very similar facies in Ohio. Now to see if there is a faunal list. :look:

 

Birchard et al (2004): "Anderdon Member: alternating zones of light-tan to brown, medium- to thick-bedded, sparsely fossiliferous, micritic limestone and thick or massive beds of rudaceous, very fossiliferous skeletal limestone. Megafauna include varied low diversity stromatoporoid sponge assemblage involving diagnostic dendroid or digitate amphiporids Amphipora nattressi and low domical to laminar forms of Anostylostroma and Syringostroma; the rugose corals Eridophyllum and Zaphrentis; tabulate coral Hexagonaria; brachiopods Paraspirifer and Brevispirifer; bryozoans; bivalves; trilobites, gastropods and the rare rostroconch Conocardium (Best 1953; Linsley 1968; Fagerstrom 1982; Prosh and Stearn 1993; Klapper and Oliver 1995)."

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FossilNerd

Very nice Kane! It’s crazy to think you found that in what is essentially fill rock. It’s on the low end of the spectrum for the rock company, but high end for us fossil collectors. One man’s trash is another man’s treasure!  :thumbsu:

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Ludwigia

Well I'll be...:look:

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Scylla

Wow, I wish people would use fossiliferous rock for fill in my neighborhood. (Lee Creek Mine, if you are listening I got a spot you can dump all your spoil piles) 

 

How big is that bug?

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Kane
11 minutes ago, Scylla said:

Wow, I wish people would use fossiliferous rock for fill in my neighborhood. (Lee Creek Mine, if you are listening I got a spot you can dump all your spoil piles) 

 

How big is that bug?

I’ll use my secret connections to hook you up. :P 

 

The bug is about 3 cm (a bit more than 1”). No sense me waiting... I’m going back tomorrow!

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ynot

even a blind dog finds a bone from time to time.

Congratulations on the new find(s)!

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Monica

WOW, Kane - that's a beautiful trilobite!!!  Congrats on the amazing find yesterday, and good luck in your search for more today!!!

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6ix

:default_faint: I was about to ask how old the deposit was, then I saw that Trilobite........

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Kane

Another recon today to test out the different rock types. I discovered there was a whole other arm of the reservoir area tucked away that now increases the amount of rock to go through. Some of the rock is excessively dense, so part of my goal today was to break some of them down to allow for some weathering.

 

Some of these rocks are blank, and others are ridiculously fossiliferous. On to some pics.  

P8230257.JPG

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Kane

Although a few more Pseudoechenella sp. pygidia were being found, Crassiproetus was emerging among the more bryozoanal rock. Also pictured here are some crystals within a coral, and a gastropod steinkern.

P8230263.JPG

P8230264.JPG

P8230265.JPG

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Kane

And here's a plate of gastro steinkerns. A bit tough to make out. Also, this pretty neat branching beauty (the chisel is a 1" wide tip).

P8230266.JPG

P8230267.JPG

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Kane

And finally, in the "what the heck is this?" category. I'm reasonably certain this is a trilobite pygidium fragment, but a preliminary dig into my literature is not telling me which one. Possibly Acanthopyge?

P8230270.JPG

P8230272.JPG

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