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Bone Daddy

Kayak and Trolling Motor Question

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Bone Daddy

Does anyone here use a trolling motor with their kayak while fossil-hunting?

 

If so, how did you mount the motor to your yak?

 

I have a "Lifetime" brand kayak with a flat back on it. They sell a metal bracket to mount a small motor that straps on to the back of the yak. Unfortunately, the bracket is almost $200 - about double the cost of the trolling motor I am considering. While I might be able to convince the wife that a $99 trolling motor (plus $50 battery) is necessary, I doubt I can push my luck and drop another $200 on a bracket that is basically $10 worth of stamped steel and a couple of $2 straps.

Honestly, even if I had the cash, I wouldn't drop it on something that probably costs $20 to make. I'm more of a DIY guy.

 

So, how did you mount your motor?

 

 

wrongway.JPG

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grandpa

Hey BD,

 

I'm not sure how DIY-savy you may be but here's some info to address your question:  https://kayakudos.com/how-to-mount-a-trolling-motor-to-a-kayak/

 

AND:

 

AND:

 

Hope one or more of these help.  Good luck on the project.

 

Tom

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Tidgy's Dad

Or this :

Image result for yak motor animal

Sorry.:unsure:

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Ramo

In Kansas if you put a motor on a boat, you must register it, and pay property taxes on it.  Even an electric motor on a kayak. 

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Brett Breakin' Rocks

Hi there,

 

I feel you *right here* .. I used to have a single Lifetime kayak and had to bite the bullet and purchase a solid mounting bracket for my trolling motor.  A  few things to consider as @Ramo has mentioned, here in Georgia, as well as in Florida I believe you will need to register the Kayak if it has a motor since now it is not only paddle power but it has a propeller too. In Georgia, that entails registering with the DNR and paying a registration fee of 35$ for 2 years. So .. not all bad.

 

2nd thing to consider is weight.  I had to swap out my 10 ft Kayak completely for a 11.5 that has a much greater Max weight rating.  Those marine batteries, motor mount (even a DIY one), and motor can be quite extensive.  Best to get a marine battery that can handle your max amperage/hour (full speed) for an hour -in my opinion-  Even at half that you are probably looking at a battery that will add 20-30lbs at least to your kayak. 

 

You can check most Kayak company websites but most suggest you don't even approach close to the max load .. say 60% - 75% ( I can't honestly remember exactly) or your risk creating an unsafe and unstable situation, not to mention sitting much lower in the water. 

 

I don't see any scupper holes on the back portion of your kayak ... but I have seen some DIY options (similar to the ones above) that use Fishing Rod holders/scupper holes mounted in the rear to hold PVC pipes mounted with a solid 2x4 and a mounting plate also made of wood. As the cheapest option. But that also looks heeeavy ... and you will need to mount the battery in a way that acts as ballast and helps to counter a side-mounted prop. Not to mention the potential for a low hanging stern in the water.

 

I had to eventually go with a Perception Tribe that had almost 100 lbs max weight rating over my last kayak. I will at some point mount the motor and add pad eyes with rivets to tie everything down and make sure it doesn't go sinking to the bottom should I capsize.

 

Good Luck !  There are some clever builds out there but they 'usually' entail a good mounting location on the kayak .. something that will evenly distribute the weight to avoid stress fractures. Somethin I didn't have on my old bird.

 

Some cool builds:

 

Uses the scupper holes again and a 2x6 .. which I was attracted to since the build looks sturdy and I am often in fairly rough conditions.

 

 

Cheers,

Brett

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Bob Saunders

marine batteries usually charge at a lower rate than a car battery. do you have a charger? If out after dark you may need 2 battery operated Nav lights. 

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Bone Daddy

Hi Folks!

 

Thanks for the helpful replies!  :)

In Florida I will have to register the yak, which I am OK with. In the past, this was not necessary, but the law changed several years ago. I already have to register my truck and camper, so I will just add a kayak to the list.

 

This looks very doable. I already have a garage full of PVC and lumber, so I just need to get the motor now.

 

As far as weight goes, the Lifetime tandem yak (the one I use most often) has a 425# capacity, which is plenty when I am using it solo. With my wife and our fossil gear, it might be pushing it a little. I think my Sun Dolphin 12-foot yak can handle it also - the only way to find out is to try. 

 

I'll get a smallish battery - the bare minimum I can get away with. I just need a little extra help in the areas where the river runs hard. I'll paddle most of the way. I don't kayak at night, so I am not concerned with lights.

 

Thanks for the tips. I'll post an update in a month or two after I get everything rigged up.  :)

 

 

 

 

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Brett Breakin' Rocks
4 hours ago, Bone Daddy said:

Thanks for the tips. I'll post an update in a month or two after I get everything rigged up. 

Please do ... we wanna see your rig ! Good luck. 

 

B

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Brett Breakin' Rocks
On 11/6/2019 at 8:46 AM, Bone Daddy said:

Thanks for the tips. I'll post an update in a month or two after I get everything rigged up.

This is my rig so far. Tried it out twice and it was nice to be able to relax at times and really take in the views. I've got 2 batteries. One that can run 55AH and 35AH ... makes the 10mile+ round-trip with ocean tide shifts a heck of a lot easier. The dry well has been a god send.

 

78505410_2463936097061541_4153480842657660928_n.thumb.jpg.3cdca97151abc20722ceb408140868d6.jpg

 

Cheers,

Brett

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Bone Daddy

Nice rig you have there. It reminds me that I need to do a little work on my deck for mounting things. Let me ask you a basic question, how do you reach inside the hull to run those screws-nuts to mount cleats and stuff on the deck (like your motor mount). I can reach my arm inside the two big hatches I have, but my long arms only reach so far. I'd like to mount a few small cleats around the deck, but can't figger out how people do that.

 

I was wishing I had a motor on my last trip out. I forgot to bring the bolt-in seat backs for my tandem yak, and it was like sitting down on a big paddleboard and trying to paddle that. LOL.

 

I haven't done much modifying to the kayak yet, but that is about to change when I finally get my hands on a motor and finish doing the deck work I want to do.

 

fossil-yak.JPG

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Brett Breakin' Rocks
3 hours ago, Bone Daddy said:

how do you reach inside the hull to run those screws-nuts to mount

Hey ... I had the same issues and went with rivets. You can find lots of info online concerning rivets vs well nuts (screws). 

 

Well nuts are screws that use a rubber gasket and a screw. The screw tightens up the gasket on the interior of the hull and acts ... kind of like a screw post for drywall. Probably fine for things that won't take big loads.

 

watersports-warehouse-10-32-rubber-well-nut.jpg.ffb8861b7bd009efab0ef8aef5fe4cc3.jpg

 

Rivets require a rivet puller to essentially pull up the center pin and fold the rivet into place on the interior of the hull. They are far superior and can handle much more stress and loads. I found some calculations online and rivets (outside of bolting from the hull interior) are the way to go. You can get rivets at West Marine or online and you can find small hand rivet pullers at most big box hardware stores. And they are cheap.

41GA2uJAwEL._SX466_.jpg.8d206a54f715d81a376a3c02e8c7dc2d.jpg

 

20191208_093530.thumb.jpg.6fb9358a553f9f177d2f19a23284966b.jpg

 

PS. And yes ... tie downs are key for the environment I'm in. If I would ever capsize (which is always a possibility)  for any reason I need everything nice and secure. 

 

Cheers,

Brett

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Bone Daddy

Thanks for the info. I knew about rivets, but was unaware about well nuts. Yeah, I don't think I would trust a well nut for much - maybe a drink holder or something like that.

So, you don't run into any issues with rivets and the objects you are riveting to the hull? Like, do those rivets fit neatly inside the recesses of cleat where the bolts are supposed to go?

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Brett Breakin' Rocks
5 hours ago, Bone Daddy said:

So, you don't run into any issues with rivets and the objects you are riveting to the hull? Like, do those rivets fit neatly inside the recesses of cleat where the bolts are supposed to go?

Not yet .. all of the holes are a standard size 'so far' and I've not had any issues riveting pretty much anything and everything to the hull. I go with Yakgear for the rivets because they are a standard size that fits kayak accessories. And ...... the installation is fast but semi-permanent. So measure twice and drill once.  haha

 

Rivets_02.thumb.jpg.592ba3774fbcee18b250967404683ff0.jpg

 

Rivets_01.thumb.jpg.a5dfd4db40cae8daaa389856203b2e11.jpg

Cheers,

Brett

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