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Hi all,

I have been staring at this tooth for quite a while now with question marks in my head. It was found in the Bissekty Formation, Kyzylkum desert, Uzbekistan. It's 27mm long (1.01 inch) and properly labeled as Theropod indet. However, the seller raises the possibility of it being a Dromaeosaurid. Serrations do look different in length and width, a count on screen gives me distal 13/5mm and mesial 16/5mm. What throws me off is the rather 'stout' crown and round cross section, more Tyrannosaurid in my view. However, I have no reference images and the only publication I found (Sues and Averianov 2014) is not exactly helpful. I posted available images - I could contact the seller if additional information is required. Any input is highly appreciated.

 

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The preservation doesn’t look entirely like the Bissetky but that’s just my opinion. Looks more like Morocco.

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Nice tooth.  There are no tyrannosaurids in the Bissekty Formation but your tooth looks like the tyrannosauroid Timurlengia euotica.   Itemirus medullaris the only Dromaeosaurid currently described from there has teeth that cannot always be unambiguously distinguished from juvenile tyrannosauroids other than the stoutness since they are compressed.  Your tooth looks very stout, an observation you made and looks to be an anterior T. euotica.   Mesial serrations are typically more dense than distal on these teeth.  Preservation is typical of this fauna and similar to others in my collection but does vary into greys and the brown reds are also very typical of KK material.

 

 

 

 

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thanks for the help, yes, that's what I thought. I am still stunned by the preservation of the serrations.
As for the coloration - I played a little with brightness and contrast of the pictures as they were pretty dark.
Does anyone have good images of a Itemirus medullaris tooth, would love to get a better idea about serrations and cross section, as some Timurlengia teeth are very compressed as well.

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37 minutes ago, JoeS said:

some Timurlengia teeth are very compressed as well

Those are lateral teeth and those are harder to distinguish with Dromaeosaurid's.  CB ratios probably need to be identified 

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DinoFossilsUK

I have quite a lot of Timurlengia teeth and this one certainly fits the profile, way too chunky to be a Dromaeoaur tooth.  And like Troodon said, colouration varies on teeth from Bissekty.  Looks like a great tooth!

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