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Othniel C. Marsh

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I have (finally) got around to going through my Moroccan phosphate shark teeth. I've attempted to identify them but I am still not particularly confident at identifying fossils so I thought I'd run it by the experts first. All the teeth are (supposed to be) from the Eocene, save 4 which is (supposed to be) from the Cretaceous. I attempted to label the images with my proposed identifications but there wasn't enough space for all of them so I'll list them all here:

 

1. Ginglymostomatid (Nebrius?)

2-3. Hemipristis?
4. Unsure
5. Pristid/Sawfish (Pristis?)

6. Otodontid (Cretalamna?)
7-10. Odontaspidid

 

The lighting is also quite poor on these images as the enamel on the teeth is very reflective and they show up as amorphous white blobs if it's too bright as my phone camera is by no means the best.

 

image.thumb.png.e4d485634e3be8ff60d7cac86c8fcc2f.png

image.thumb.png.0fb3db7124aad039b4201eb32f80156f.png

20231128_143110.thumb.jpg.c0164191c3eddcec0d3ddc2bfa892dbf.jpg

 

Thanks in advance for any proposed ID's
Othniel

Edited by Othniel C. Marsh
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First one, cropped and contrasted:

 

image.thumb.png.e4d485634e3be8ff60d7cac86c8fcc2f.png

 

Have you tried downloading a free magnifying app, like Magnifier?

Might help with some of your pictures.

Also daylight helps with clarity, rather than artificial lighting.

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To my knowledge there are no Hemipristis in phosphates in Morocco. These teeth are not anyway.

 

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#2 and 3 look like Carcharhinus species.

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I never considered Carcharhinus, sixgill pete, but I think you're right.

I know @Macrophyseter has some experience with Moroccan shark teeth. What do you reckon the other teeth are?

Edited by Othniel C. Marsh
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  • 4 weeks later...

A couple more teeth for identification:

 

The one on the left is from the Eocene Moroccan phosphates and is probably another odontaspidid, albeit a larger species than the others. The one on the right, however, was sold as an Isurus desori tooth from the Palaeocene of Dakhla in West Sahara. The tooth is much broader and stockier than the other teeth and bears substantial resemblance to my Cosmopolitodus hastalis tooth so I would be inclined to assign it to that group of shark.

 

20231229_103038.thumb.jpg.5a1f20923008804cf22bb6d4a7164c99.jpg

 

Thanks in advance for any proposed ID's
Othniel

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The one on the right appears to have cusplets, albeit worn. I think this rules out Isurus desori. They are probably both sand tiger. 

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Which species of sand tiger? Also many of the other teeth are yet to be ID'd so any help with them would also be appreciated.

Edited by Othniel C. Marsh
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Could the tooth sold as one belonging to an Isurus be from a Macrorhizodus or similar? I know Macrorhizodus falcatus is known from the Priabonian of the Samlat Formation in Dakhla, and I've seen Macrorhizodus teeth with cusps like those on the aforementioned tooth.

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On 12/29/2023 at 11:45 AM, Othniel C. Marsh said:

A couple more teeth for identification:

 

The one on the left is from the Eocene Moroccan phosphates and is probably another odontaspidid, albeit a larger species than the others. The one on the right, however, was sold as an Isurus desori tooth from the Palaeocene of Dakhla in West Sahara. The tooth is much broader and stockier than the other teeth and bears substantial resemblance to my Cosmopolitodus hastalis tooth so I would be inclined to assign it to that group of shark.

 

20231229_103038.thumb.jpg.5a1f20923008804cf22bb6d4a7164c99.jpg

 

Thanks in advance for any proposed ID's
Othniel

I think the one on the left is a Striatolamia striata, the other one looks like Serratolamna lerichei

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sorry just seeing this now. I’m not good with sand tiger ID, but the species mentioned above sound right

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No worries Patelinho7. What about the non-odontaspidid teeth in the first post? 

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Posted (edited)

Have you got any suggestions with regards to these teeth, @Anomotodon?

Edited by Othniel C. Marsh
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  • 4 weeks later...

I’m not the best person for shark teeth ID, especially considering there’s no clear information on the age/provenance for each tooth. Especially with sand tigers, I can’t tell if they are Cretaceous or Cenozoic. 2-3 are definitely Bull shark species (Carcharhinus), 4 might be a mackerel shark species, 5 doesn’t look like a sawfish rostral tooth to me, but I could be wrong. 7-10 and the new photos all seem like odontaspids. No clue about 1 or 6, or specific IDs for any.

 

 

Maybe @Al Dente knows?

 

 

 

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Thanks patelinho7. They're all from the Eocene save number 4, which is from the Cretaceous.

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3 actually looks like Squalicorax kaupi, not quite sure if it occurs in Morocco tho..

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Definitely not Squalicorax kaupi, it would have to be ridiculously beat up be construed as such, and even then, the root morphology wouldn't make sense.

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  • 3 weeks later...

After further research I have come to the conclusion that specimen 5 is indeed a Pristis rostral barb, or at least the tip of one.

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I did originally wonder if it was a very worn teleost tooth, but the rostral barbs of Pristis and similar animals are more likely.

 

download.jpg.d4fd920601c7e2e42e89dd6aa2953db2.jpg

Pristidae_-_Pristis_lathami.thumb.jpg.5c69711ff1903a8e69e4abc0e039f7a6.jpg

CG2005_Fig_04.jpg.a74b1c7b3c64de59f5bdcc23d221d81d.jpg

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