Jesuslover340

Show Us Your Croc, Gator, and Turtle Material!

196 posts in this topic

Borealosuchus, maybe.  Yup.  I believe I had a vocal appearance in the Nat Geo sarcosuchus show.  In the beginning you can hear my voice.  

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Forgot to put those other pics in this thread!

 

Heres all my croc stuff together.

 

Scutes:

 

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Vertebrae:

 

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Jaws:

 

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And teeth:

 

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I was out in some remote badlands yesterday. There was a hoodoo (photo) with an 'explosion' of petrified wood above and dino bone in the light bentonite clay.  Isolated Turtle material is relatively common but I came across a  'turtle graveyard' layer in this same hoodoo.    Perhaps a dozen or so individual turtles.  Partial shell in photo about 20cms across. Also lots of dino bone ...so bone under shell likely dino.

 

Remote locale and hot.  Marked the spot with my GPS and may return some day to put together some turtle jigsaw puzzles.

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Sounds like it would be a good bit of fun, turtle jigsaws :D

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That first photo is mesmerizing!

 

Seeing as @Ash is at work, I'll post this pic for him: 

Pallimnarchus pollens tooth from Australia :)

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These are all from GMR in Pitt Co. NC.  Croc teeth, scute, vertebrae and turtle leg bone.

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On 5/15/2017 at 9:35 PM, greel said:

These are all from GMR in Pitt Co. NC.  Croc teeth, scute, vertebrae and turtle leg bone.

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Nice! Love the little scute!

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Gavialosuchus americanus tooth with wear from Bone Valley:

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Alligator mississippiensis scute from the Leisey Shell Pit in Florida:

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And my newest acquisition-a fossil gator tooth from the Pleistocene of north Florida :) Has some very slight enamel peel on the backside but it's a beautiful rooted tooth :wub:

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6 hours ago, Jesuslover340 said:

And my newest acquisition-a fossil gator tooth from the Pleistocene of north Florida :) Has some very slight enamel peel on the backside but it's a beautiful rooted tooth :wub:

20170617_233327-1.jpg

 

I have never seen such a fully-rooted croc/gator tooth before! :drool:

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48 minutes ago, -Andy- said:

 

I have never seen such a fully-rooted croc/gator tooth before! :drool:

Nor I! I had wondered if it might be croc, though...

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Nope. Two distinct "seam" ridges along the crown indicates gator (crocs have many more than two ridges running down the tooth).

 

Really nice to see a rooted specimen. The connection from the root to the crown must be pretty thin and brittle as we usually only find the conical crowns with the concave hollow inside and no trace of the roots.

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

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11 minutes ago, digit said:

Nope. Two distinct "seam" ridges along the crown indicates gator (crocs have many more than two ridges running down the tooth).

 

Really nice to see a rooted specimen. The connection from the root to the crown must be pretty thin and brittle as we usually only find the conical crowns with the concave hollow inside and no trace of the roots.

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

Would that be diagnostic, though? @Ash has a couple Pallimnarchus pollens (a crocodile) teeth from Australia that have the same two ridges and are quite similar to this one in shape. Unless that's the current identification method between gator and croc teeth for Florida?

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15 minutes ago, digit said:

Nope. Two distinct "seam" ridges along the crown indicates gator (crocs have many more than two ridges running down the tooth).

 

Really nice to see a rooted specimen. The connection from the root to the crown must be pretty thin and brittle as we usually only find the conical crowns with the concave hollow inside and no trace of the roots.

 

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

Oh! And I've heard that rooted teeth are rare because it means the animal had to have died (the teeth weren't lost throughout life or broken off but were present at its death).

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I only know this distinction for Florida finds--your mileage may vary elsewhere (out of my league on crocodilians outside of the state of Florida).

 

I could believe that rooted gator teeth may only come from teeth still in the skull at the time of death. Oddly, it is kind of reverse for shark teeth. Apparently, the outer enamel on the tooth crown forms first and then the solid interior space of the crown and the root form later. If you find "hollow" shark tooth crowns then you know those teeth were still being developed when the animal died (and that they were not old shed teeth).

 

Cheers.

 

-Ken

 

 

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Here's a few of my better cretaceous croc teeth (Deinosuchus rugosus) from south Alabama...The larger one in the second picture is 2-3/8" long.  

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Here's a few unknowns from the same area in South Alabama. The top two are more than likely Borealosuchus but the others are unknowns at this time.

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Here's my best Croc scute from the same area

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4 hours ago, Mtskinner said:

Here's a few unknowns from the same area in South Alabama. The top two are more than likely Borealosuchus but the others are unknowns at this time.

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4 hours ago, Mtskinner said:

Here's my best Croc scute from the same area

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Officially JEALOUS!!!! :drool:

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5 hours ago, Mtskinner said:

Here's a few of my better cretaceous croc teeth (Deinosuchus rugosus) from south Alabama...The larger one in the second picture is 2-3/8" long.  

 

 

Very nice.

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Wow!  Some truly amazing fossils in this huge thread.  I never bothered to open it up cause I had no such material.  Got back from South Dakota not too long ago and ran into a guy who had fossil tortoises for sale.  Bought 2 of them.  didnt know they were such a pain in the rear to prep, but still a lot of fun.  I know they are common as dirt in some places but i will post this anyways. 

 

RB

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Nice, fellas and ladies!

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