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  1. patrick plesiosaurus

    is this a lepidodendron ??

    I am quite sure this is a tree/gymnosperm Is it a lepidodendron. It was found in the screameston coal member carboniferous, Northumberland England.
  2. I visited a coal mine last weekend with a group, and we had a good time finding Carboniferous era fossils. There were large volumes of plant fossils. I did find a few marine fossils (brachiopods) also. I found the "thing" below as well, which mystified me. I found it splitting a rock, and there was a counterpart as well. I did not retain the counterpart, perhaps I should have (it was broken). Formation: Pottsville Group Age: Pennsylvanian Period, Westphalian-A (312 million years old) .Jefferson County, AL Anyone know what this might be?
  3. I was fortunate to be able to take two trips recently to the Marmaton group in Northern Missouri and wanted to share my trip report with the forum. It's hard to find information on the Marmaton in Missouri, and I struggled with the geology and understanding what members within the Marmaton I was seeing, but I had a great time non the less. I grew up in this region and have some ‘insiders’ information on a few spots I wanted to check out just from spending time running around the countryside as a kid. The first was in a local creek in the township I grew up in that contains concreti
  4. jwalker

    Bone, Coal, Petrified Wood???

    Need some ID help please. Found on the beach in South Carolina. Roughly 2” by 1.5”. Thanks.
  5. clarkbowman

    Union Chapel Mine

    New to the site and have found a lot of odds and ends over the years, more by accident then out on hunts. But now wanting to get some of my grand kids into fossil hunting. So here is my question. Can you hunt for fossils at the Union Chapel Mine? If not is there any old mines you can hunt in Alabama? Thanks
  6. Mucelium

    An archosaurian egg ?

    Hello everyone, I am a Belgian student in biology, and I love paleontology. Last week, I was walking on a slag heap near my home in the town of Marcinelle, at the coal mine called "Bois du Cazier". My attention was mainly focused on fossils of carboniferous plants (sigilaria, cordaites, calamites, etc ...). But at one point, I picked up this pretty little pebble which seemed to me to be a fossilized archosaurian egg. The slag heaps do not really respect the order of the geological layers, so it is very difficult for me to pin a year on it.
  7. Coal-burning in Siberia led to climate change 250 million years ago, Arizona State University https://asunow.asu.edu/20200615-coal-burning-siberia-led-climate-change-250-million-years-ago Elkins-Tanton, L.T., Grasby, S.E., Black, B.A., Veselovskiy, R.V., Ardakani, O.H. and Goodarzi, F., 2020. Field evidence for coal combustion links the 252 Ma Siberian Traps with global carbon disruption. Geology, 48. (open access) https://pubs.geoscienceworld.org/gsa/geology/article/doi/10.1130/G47365.1/587319/Field-evidence-for-coal-combustion-links-the-252
  8. t-tree

    Jaw

    As some of you will know i have been showing some of my uncommon find from my years of collecting from opencasts in Derbyshire,UK. This find is from the coal measures and is in coal shale that produced fish teeth , fish scales and bivalves it is 18mm long 5mm wide. I have posted it before along time ago can you give me your opinions of what you think it is Thank-you. 18mm x 5mm Cheers John
  9. Can someone tell me what that rock that contains these plants is. Ash maybe? its a shale type material almost flint it feels like it was found in south central WV in Lincoln county it comes from the pennsylvanian era i believe.
  10. I am lucky enough to have permission to collect fossils at an old coal mining tip in West Yorkshire, UK. The site is now a woods, but pieces of shale can be found, containing upper Carboniferous fish fossils including sharks and Rhizodonts. At this time of year, collecting is difficult due to the leafs which cover the shale. The vast majority of the shale comes from a mussel band, which as the name suggests, contains abundant bivalves, but generally the fish remains are very small. The exceptions to this are blocks of the mussel band which contain orange coloured bivalves. These blocks se
  11. Kurtoid

    Just a weird "rock"?

    Hi all. While working in northern alberta Canada, I found a couple of these odd "rocks" amongst a bunch of normal football sized stones. I have zero experience with anything in this field. But they stood out to me, so I took one home. I'm not hopping it's anything. But I'm very curious about it. As its structure looks organic to my untrained eyes. So I just wanted to throw some pictures out there. And see if it's just some coal and odd sedimentation. After cleaning it with hot water, I grabbed a small hammer and chisel and started poking around the "back" side. I figur
  12. Mctapmonkey

    preserving fossils in coal.

    Hello, On a recent holiday to Kent I picked up some carboniferous plant fossils from a disused coal pit. Being in coal however they are rather crumbly and will not survive in their present state. Are there any methods for treatment suitable for a lightweight beginner to stabilise fossils in coal that I could use to prevent deterioration?
  13. ESCONI recently announced a field trip to the Starved Rock Clay Pit in IL on 8/17. The layers are, from top down: Mecca Quarry Shale, Francis Creek Shale, Colchester No. 2 Coal, and paleosol. I was lucky enough to see the post in time to get on the list before it filled up. Anyone else here going? Also, I know ESCONI has been there before. Have any of you been there previously and have any tips you could share? This is my first trip to a quarry so I'm not sure what to expect.
  14. Mctapmonkey

    carboniferous, plant, coal,

    Hello Fossil Fans, I found this recently at a disused coal pit in Kent (Thanet). I believe it to be carboniferous plant material. Can anyone be more specific? Also because of the nature of the coal it is very crumbly so any advice on preservation would be welcome.
  15. Hello! I'm new here so, please be gentle. I found a bone in the middle of my yard, in the grass, that wasn't there a few days before. I have looked and asked everywhere for someone to tell me from what animal it came. The kicker, for me, is that, a few feet outside the edge of our yard is a huge coal dump. You can't see it in the pictures, but there are tiny pieces of coal inside the hollow parts of the bone. Plus, I'm wondering where all of the (possibly) tiny tooth marks in #2 came from, and the wearing down of the bone in #4. Any help would be appreciated. Thank you! ps. I di
  16. Hey everybody! Welcome to my Mazon Creek thread, where I’ll be posting pictures of various Mazon Creek finds! I’ve been hunting there for upwards of 10 years, so I have piles of uncracked nodules just waiting to be opened. So as they open, they’ll find their way here! Feel free to jump in and add your own and keep this thread going! And I’m sure there are many that have gone unidentified, so I’ll probably need some help from the experts!
  17. link Martino, R. L., 2004, Sequence stratigraphy of the Glenshaw Formation(middle– late Pennsylvanian) in the central Appalachian basin, in :J. C. Pashin and R. A. Gastaldo, eds., Sequence stratigraphy,paleoclimate, and tectonics of coal-bearing strata: AAPG Studies in Geology 51, p. 1–28. size: about 6 Mb the emphasis is on sequence stratigraphy and (correlation of)paleosols: the need for a background of knowledge of these subjects lies in the gray area between "absolutely necessary" and "comes in handy"
  18. Levon

    Found in coal seam

    I work in the coal mine in South western pa. Northern wv. I find petrified wood mostly fern tree piece but can't find much about them online. I also find what I think is pyrite.I know that they are mostly fern. They are out of the Pittsburgh seam and are around 330 million years old. Any other info would be appreciated.
  19. Zenmaster6

    Mess of Things I need Identifyed

    Ok, I went looking for fossils in Renton, Washington state. I also went to Tukwila Washington (supposedly there are plant fossils here.) I found some things and maybe anyone could confirm if they are indeed fossils or something else. I'm not aiming for species of genus, the quality of these are not to that level, BUT if you have an idea, let me know. Thanks all. (I'm going to do kind of a dump here with all my findings.) Fig. A: Found in Green River Tukwila Washington. Not sure just picked the piece up about 1 1/2 inches long. Fig. B: Found in sedimentary rock in Renton Cedar rive
  20. Zenmaster6

    What does this mean?

    When walking along titlow beach in WA (Eocene time period) and we find coal buried in the side of a cliff. Does this mean there was a plant there? bacteria? Tree bark? How did this get here? Also when walking along a Covington river far from the ocean in WA, we find a perfect stripe of coal on the side of a sedimentary rock wall. We can dig it out and it goes back very far. Does this mean that it was the bottom of a lake, ocean or forest where plenty of plants died and were covered in sediment? How did this coal even get here. Does this mean there might be fossils nearby?
  21. Still_human

    Edestus teeth

    From the album: Sharks and fish

    The shark relative is genus of eugenodontia holocephalid from the Carboniferous-Pennsylvanian age Anna shale formation, Carbondale group, found in different Illinois coal mines. I dont know(yet)which mine these were found in. This unidentified species is of the "vorax-serratus- crenulatus-heinrichi" or "E. heinrichi group", with the teeth being more of a standard triangular shape, as opposed to being thinner and pointed at a forward angle as in the "E. minor" group http://www.thefossilforum.com/applications/core/interface/file/attachment.php?id=50175
  22. gobbler716

    No idea what this is.

    I have several fossils like the one shown here. My collection is approx 300-350 years old, Cahaba River Valley, central Alabama, carboniferous. The size is about the same as a shoe sole. Any idea what it is? Leave comment if more info is needed.
  23. Surfcoast Phil

    Coal seam ?

    Very new to fossil hunting. I was wondering if I would be likely to find any other kinds of fossils in a sandstone outcrop with lots of what looks like coal seams running through it - see picture.
  24. Oxytropidoceras

    Coal Formation and Near-global Glaciation

    Feulner, G., 2017. Formation of most of our coal brought Earth close to global glaciation. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 114(43), pp. 11333-11337. Abstract: http://www.pnas.org/content/114/43/11333.short https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29073052 Paper: https://pdfs.semanticscholar.org/0b23/8273be5a2b4f06d7fb1e5932b45f731944be.pdf Yours, Paul H.
  25. Dear Guys, Last september I was in the coal quarry in Donbass region, near Donetsk and found these leaves and one seed fossil. The majority of leaves are from seed ferns but other remains are unidentified. Please help to identify the taxons (also seed fern genera or families) if you know more about Carboniferous plants. Best Regards Domas
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